Category: Education

Timely consultations relevant for family medicine, primary care, and general internal medicine topics for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and residents. Offering CME credit for most episodes at https://ce.mayo.edu/podcast. Produced by @MayoMedEd.

May 4, 2021

Regenerative Medicine Edition Ep.1: Transforming Care Towards Curative Solutions

To claim credit for this episode, visit: www.ce.mayo.edu/regmedonline

Guest: Fredric B. Meyer, M.D.; Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Imagine a patient who has suffered a massive myocardial infarction leaving a significant amount of damaged and non-functioning ventricular myocardium. Treatment for this patient’s subsequent congestive failure does not involve diuretics and beta blockers but rather an injection of the patient’s modified stem cells into surrounding viable ventricular myocardium resulting in the regeneration of new, functioning myocardial cells restoring the cardiac output. This is not science fiction but represents ongoing work by investigators in Regenerative Medicine. This week’s podcast will explore this amazing field of medicine which has the potential to change how medicine is practiced. We’ll discuss the origins of regenerative medicine, what currently be done in regenerative medicine as well as the potential for the future. Our guests today are Andre Terzic, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine and Fredric B. Meyer, M.D., a neurosurgeon and the Executive Dean for Education at the Mayo Clinic.

 Specific topics discussed:

  • When the field of regenerative medicine began
  • Which current medical conditions can currently be managed with regenerative medicine
  • How to determine which patients have potential for regenerative medicine therapies

Additional educational opportunities from Mayo Clinic:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 29, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence and the Importance of That Second Dose

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in April, 2021

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd

While the number of people being vaccinated for COVID-19 is dropping, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other medical experts continue to strongly encourage people to get vaccinated for COVID-19. And that means that those who are being vaccinated with the Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine should get their first and second doses on schedule.

“About 8% of people who got their first dose have not returned for the second dose and this is concerning when you're getting close to 1 in 10," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "When you measure in the short term, one dose in a healthy person offers about 80% protection. But that's not 95% protection, like you get after two doses."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland expands on why people need that second COVID-19 vaccine dose and he talks about whether people should mix and match the different COVID-19 vaccines for their second dose. He also speaks about the status of COVID-19 vaccines for young people, and he addresses listener questions about traveling, being together after vaccination, and the latest rise of additional COVID-19 variants.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 27, 2021

Fact or Fiction: Erectile Dysfunction Treatments

Guest: Tobias S. Kohler, M.D., M.P.H.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Erectile dysfunction not only causes lifestyle changes, but it may also be the first symptom of peripheral vascular disease. Since many men are reluctant to mention erectile dysfunction to their healthcare provider, it’s important for us to ask our patients whether it is a problem and be knowledgeable in the appropriate evaluation of patients who have it. This reluctance may cause many to seek out readily available but ineffective treatments from questionable sources, even though there are a variety of proven, effective treatments that can be prescribed. Tobias S. Kohler, M.D., M.P.H., a Mayo Clinic Urologist, joins us to discuss the impact of erectile dysfunction, the currently available effective treatments, as well as the unproven, ineffective products currently being used.

Specific topics discussed:

  • The first historical appearance of treatments for erectile dysfunction
  • Most common causes of dysfunction
  • Appropriate evaluation of patients who present with erectile dysfunction
  • Review of the currently available effective treatment options
  • Reasons men are reluctant to mention the topic of erectile dysfunction to their provider
  • Review of some ineffective treatments currently being promoted

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 22, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 70: Mayo Clinic Q&A - Breakthrough COVID-19 Infections and Booster Vaccines

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded on April 19, 2021.

To claim credit visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/covid19podcast

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd

Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group says COVID-19mutations and the virus spread are happening because of people who don't wear masks, who don't get vaccinated and who don't adhere to safety recommendations.

"I believe that we should be radically transparent and honest," says Dr. Poland. "The more time this virus passes through one person after another, the more likely it continues to mutate. As a result of those mutations, two things are happening. Some of the mutations are making vaccines and plasma monoclonal antibodies less effective. The other thing is that the virus will likely become something that we have to live with for the rest of our lives."

Dr. Poland reminds people that vaccine protection is not 100%. Breakthrough infections can occur.

"Remember that in the clinical trials, 95% means that compared to unvaccinated people, your risk is reduced by 95% — not 100%," he says. "You might have a mild case of COVID-19,but you can still spread it to others, including those who are immune compromised, such as cancer patients. That's why we continue to wear masks until we get very widespread immunization."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland talks more about breakthrough infections and the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine pause, and he answers listeners' questions.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 21, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: On the Verge of Another COVID-19 Surge

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in April, 2021

To claim credit visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/covid19podcast 

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)   

As spring break travelers return home and the highly transmissible U.K. COVID-19 variant is discovered in all 50 U.S. states, the country is on the verge of a fourth COVID-19 pandemic surge. That's according to a number of health experts, including Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group.  

However, Dr. Poland says there is some good news related to the transmission of COVID-19 on surfaces. 

"Wisdom resides in changing your mind and your recommendations as new data and science becomes available," says Dr. Poland. "What the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is doing is modifying those guidelines, saying that the risk of touching a contaminated surface and then getting infected is very low."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast Dr. Poland explains more about the CDC guidelines and he addresses other COVID-19 topics in the news, including recent data that says men are more vaccine-hesitant than women.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 20, 2021

Utilizing Artificial Intelligence to Evaluate Dizziness

Guest: Devin L. McCaslin, Ph.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Being dizzy means different things to different patients and most patients find dizziness difficult to describe. Providers find it difficult to evaluate patients with dizziness and also which specialties can be asked for help in managing the dizzy patient. Dr. Devin McCaslin is the Director of the Vestibular and Balance Laboratory at the Mayo Clinic and an expert in evaluating the dizzy patient. He will discuss such topics as the role of vestibular balance laboratory testing in assessing patients, the most common findings from these evaluations, the multi-disciplinary approach to evaluating patients with dizziness, and how artificial intelligence is being used in the evaluation of a patient complaining of dizziness.

Specific Topics Discussed:

  • The multi-disciplinary approach to evaluating patients complaining of dizziness.
  • Most common findings in the evaluation of a patient with dizziness.
  • The role of vestibular balance laboratory testing in assessing patients who are candidates for these tests.
  • How artificial intelligence is being used in the evaluation of patients with dizziness.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 19, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: Vacation Travel, Vaccines for Teens and More COVID-19 News

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in April, 2021

To claim credit visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/covid19podcast 

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)  

 If you're fully vaccinated for COVID-19 you can travel domestically and where travel is allowed internationally, according to new interim travel guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Even with those recommendations the CDC continues to recommend not traveling unless it is essential. Regardless, the CDC strongly recommends people continue to wear a face mask, practice social distancing and sanitize their hands.

Meanwhile, COVID-19 vaccine research is continuing in teenagers. "The early data show equal safety in young people aged 12 to 16," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "I think this is going to imply that, somewhere between this fall and Christmas, we're going to be able to offer the (COVID-19) vaccine to every age group."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland answers a number of listener questions, including how long the COVID-19 vaccines are predicted to last and if the current transmission research still supports wiping down household items. Dr. Poland also explains why someone who has had COVID-19 should still get a COVID-19 vaccine.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 13, 2021

This Podcast Will Make Your Head Spin

Guest: Scott D. Eggers, M.D. (@sdze)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD

The complaint of dizziness is a common symptom our patients experience. It has a variety of causes; fortunately, most of them are benign. Despite the fact we frequently see patients with this medical concern, we still struggle evaluating them. Part of the difficulty is that dizziness means different things to different people and the cause of dizziness can be caused by disorders in one of several organ systems. To help us evaluate dizziness, Dr. Scott Eggers, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic, reviews why dizziness is so difficult to evaluate and how we should evaluate a patient who complains of dizziness. We also explore the most common causes of dizziness including benign positional vertigo and vestibular neuritis. Finally, Dr. Eggers reviews symptoms that are suspicious for an ominous cause of dizziness.

Specific topics discussed:

  • Why dizziness is difficult to evaluate
  • How to evaluate the complaint of dizziness
  • Most common causes of dizziness
  • Dizziness symptoms which are ominous for serious disease
  • Description of benign positional vertigo
  • Description of vestibular neuritis
  • Description of vestibular migraines

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 6, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 69: Post-Acute COVID-19 and Central Sensitization

Central sensitization (CS) describes pathophysiologic changes in the central nervous system, including alterations in neurochemistry, CNS receptors, endogenous opioid system hyperactivity, cytokine and HPA axis dysregulation, and sympathetic hyperactivity. Collectively, these changes result in amplification of pain and sensory signals, leading to widespread pain, fatigue and other sensory sensitivities. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome are established diagnoses/manifestations of central sensitization. In the era of the COVID-19 pandemic, we continue to learn about Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome, a manifestation of central sensitization similar to other post-infectious forms of CS, which underlies the persistent symptoms that many people experience after initial recovery from COVID-19. Elizabeth C. Wight, M.D. joins us to talk about Mayo Clinic’s treatment approach to central sensitization, which is rooted in empowering patients with education and a framework for a self-management program. This includes stress management, moderation, positive thinking, decreasing focus on symptoms, sleep hygiene, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy among others.

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 30, 2021

Your Patient Has a Thyroid Nodule – What Now?

Guest: Jan L. Kasperbauer, M.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Thyroid nodules are commonly found in patients by primary care providers, either by physical exam or incidentally by a variety of imaging studies. Fortunately, the vast majority of thyroid nodules are benign, however as primary care providers we need to be comfortable in evaluating them to rule out the possibility that they represent a thyroid cancer. Joining us is Dr. Jan Kasperbauer, an otolaryngologist at the Mayo Clinic. We discuss risk factors for thyroid cancer, how a primary care provider should evaluate and manage patients with thyroid nodules, various types of thyroid cancer, and treatment options as well as the recommended follow-up for patients with thyroid cancer.

Specific topics discussed:

  • Risk factors for thyroid cancer
  • Detecting thyroid cancers
  • How primary care provider should evaluate and manage patients with thyroid nodules
  • Review of the various types of thyroid cancer
  • Treatment options for thyroid cancer
  • Recommendations for primary care providers in following patients with treated thyroid cancer

Additional resources:

  • Classification for risk stratification and follow up recommendations: Grant, EG, et al. Thyroid ultrasound reporting lexicon: white paper of the ACR thyroid imaging, reporting and data system (TIRADS) committee. J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Dec; 12(12): 1272-1279. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2015.07.011

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 26, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: Viruses Cannot Mutate If They Cannot Replicate

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in March, 2021

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd

The COVID-19 virus mutates and replicates when people let down their guard and don't follow safety protocols, such as practicing social distancing and wearing a mask. 

"I think most of us expect a major surge because of spring break travel and the relaxation of restrictions," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "And the sort of COVID fatigue that all of us feel, in one way or another."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland addresses the potential of a fourth COVID-19 surge, new information regarding the COVID-19 vaccines for pregnant women and he discusses research for next generation vaccines for COVID-19 variants.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 23, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 68: Skin Integrity in Patients with COVID-19

Guest: Jennifer L. Elmer, APRN, CNS, D.N.P.; Brianna M. Skrukrud, APRN, C.N.P.

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

Pressure injuries in bedridden patients present significant challenges​, which are compounded in the patient with a COVID-19 diagnosis. In this episode we discuss the problems encountered in preventing, diagnosing, and managing skin alterations in patients with COVID-19. Jennifer L. Elmer, APRN, CNS, D.N.P. and Brianna M. Skrukrud, APRN, C.N.P., two wound care experts at Mayo Clinic, discuss situations ​in which, despite best efforts, pressure injuries are unavoidable and why COVID-19 poses a great risk for skin alterations in hospitalized patients. They also discuss the 2020 position statement of National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel (NPIAP) on the management of skin alterations during the COVID-19 crisis.

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 19, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: Rapid Pace of COVID-19 Vaccinations

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in March 2021. 

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland

Host: DeeDee Stiepan (@deedeestiepan

Millions of people in the U.S. are being vaccinated for COVID-19. However, discussion is ongoing as to whether people who are immunocompromised, such as patients undergoing cancer treatment, or people who have autoimmune diseases, should be vaccinated for COVID-19. 

"Both of those categories (of people) should be vaccinated," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "Those are not contraindications. Those are indications to get the vaccine." He adds that research is ongoing, but current information demonstrates the benefits far outweigh the theoretical risks. 

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland talks about vaccine hesitancy, and patients who are immunocompromised or have autoimmune conditions. Also, he discusses next steps in the journey to vaccinate children for COVID-19. And he reviews recent guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Control about in-person gatherings. 

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 18, 2021

Can We Prevent Suicide?

* WARNING: This episode discusses suicide and suicidal ideation. *

Guest: J. Michael Bostwick, M.D.(@DrBostwick)

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

In this episode, professor of psychiatry and international authority on suicide risk and challenges in suicide prevention, J. Michael Bostwick, M.D.  from Mayo Clinic in Rochester joins us. He’ll discuss epidemiological-based research looking at the utilization patterns of medical care by individuals who have contemplated or committed suicide. Dr. Bostwick will describe the concept of suicide crisis including risk factors, current events/warning signs, and mental status/agitation. He’ll also explain self-agency, stigma of discussing mental illness, potential value-based societal approach to individuals in distress and despair, and potential solutions to the suicide prevention.

Additional resources:

If you're feeling overwhelmed by thoughts of not wanting to live or you're having urges to attempt suicide, get help now.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 17, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: “Brain Fog” is a Lingering Condition for Many COVID-19 Long-Haulers

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in March, 2021. 

Guest:  Billie A. Schultz, M.D. 

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd

Fatigue and what's being called "brain fog" are turning out to be some of the most common issues for long-hauler patients recovering from COVID-19. The National Institutes of Health calls these and other symptoms, which can last for several months, post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2, or PASC.

Those suffering from brain fog may experience short-term memory loss, confusion, difficulty concentrating, or just feeling different than they did before they had COVID-19, even if it was a mild case of the infection. 

And Dr. Billie Schultz, a Mayo Clinic physical medicine and rehabilitation expert, says, though older patients more often to have these symptoms more often, younger people are also showing up with brain fog.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Schultz says brain fog seems to be more inflammatory than infection, but there are more questions than answers about this neurological concern. Meanwhile, efforts are underway to develop rehabilitation programs to help patients recover.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 16, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 67: Finding a Solution for Every Long-Hauler

Guest: Ravindra Ganesh, M.B.B.S., M.D.

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

It has been estimated that as many as 10-30% of patients who have recovered from COVID-19 have an array of symptoms, ranging from minor to disabling, that persist more than four weeks post-COVID infection. These symptoms have not only been identified in patients who had severe symptoms of COVID-19 requiring intensive care unit treatment, but also those who only experienced mild-to-moderate symptoms.

The exact cause of this state, most popularly called post-COVID long hauler syndrome, is still under investigation. The symptoms range from mild to disabling fatigue, body aches, atypical chest pain, loss of sense of taste and smell, brain fog, among others and many of these patients need additional evaluation and management to deal with their disabling symptoms.

In this podcast Dr. Ravindra Ganesh, the consultant in General Internal Medicine who leads the COVID Frontline Care Team (CFCT) efforts, as well as the Post-COVID Clinic, at Mayo Clinic Rochester, discusses the array of symptoms, management strategies, and research possibilities, as well as opening of an upcoming clinic in Mayo Clinic Rochester that would address the concern of the patient's and deal with the post COVID long hauler symptoms

Additional Resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 9, 2021

Clostridium Difficile Infection: You Want to Transplant What?!

Guest: Maria I. Vazquez Roque, M.D. (@MVazquezRoqueMD

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD

Clostridium difficile is a toxin-producing bacterium that can result in a severe form of antibiotic-associated diarrhea known as clostridium difficile infection or CDI. Cases can vary from mild diarrhea to severe colitis that at times can be fatal. There’s been a dramatic increase in the number as well as severity of CDIs in the U.S. over the past 20 years. Although CDI typically occurs following the use of antibiotics, it can also be spread from one individual to another, especially in hospitals and skilled nursing facilities. Antibiotics have been the traditional treatment for patients with CDI, however recurrent symptoms have been a problem. There’s now a new treatment for CDI, felt to be effective in over 90% of patients with the illness. Our guest to discuss this topic is Dr. Maria Vazquez Roque, a gastroenterologist at the Mayo Clinic. We’ll review the common presenting symptoms, laboratory tests needed to establish a diagnosis, and the current recommendations for treatment including the latest of fecal transplantation. 

Additional resources: 

Clinical Practice Guidelines for Clostridium difficile Infection in Adults and Children: 2017 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA): https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix1085 

Specific topics discussed:

  • The typical presentation of C. difficile infection
  • Patients who are at increased risk for a C. difficile infection
  • Laboratory tests to order to confirm a case of C. difficile infection
  • Treatment options for C. difficile infection including fecal transplantation
  • Potential benefit of probiotics for preventing a C. difficile infection

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 3, 2021

Mayo Q & A: COVID-19 Variants and the Evolving Science

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in February, 2021

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)   

People may be curious, confused or critical of what seem to be changing messages related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, reminds folks that messages change because data changes and the science evolves.

"As we learn new science, we use that science to modify our recommendations," says Dr. Poland. "It's not that scientists are flip-flopping. It is that new data allows us to begin expanding those recommendations."

For instance, COVID-19 cases and deaths in the U.S. are currently declining. But, Dr. Poland says, there are new data predicting the possibility of another surge of COVID-19 infections in March because of U.K. variant transmission.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast Dr. Poland talks about several issues, including the U.K. variant, vaccine development and the public’s COVID-19 fatigue.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 2, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 66: Monoclonal Antibody Treatment for COVID-19

Guest: Ravindra Ganesh, M.B.B.S., M.D. and Raymund R. Razonable, M.D. 

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006

In this episode, Ravindra Ganesh, M.B.B.S., M.D. and Raymund R. Razonable, M.D. join Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. to review the use of monoclonal antibody as a new antiviral agent in the treatment of COVID-19 infection. 

Who is most likely to benefit from monoclonal antibody infusions? Drs. Ganesh and Razonable, discuss recent studies on monoclonal antibody infusions in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 infections. Also discussed are the logistical challenges faced and the innovative solutions that were implemented while administering this therapy, particularly navigating the acceptance of treatment, its real and perceived side effects, and lack of awareness due to inequity and poverty. Research on the development of subcutaneous or intramuscular administration for prophylaxis against COVID-19 in patients at high risk for complications or at high risk for being exposed to SARS-CoV-2 is also discussed in this episode. 

Additional resources: 

  • AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Navigator: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19 
  • Weinreich DM, Sivapalasingam S, Norton T, et al. REGN-COV2, a neutralizing antibody cocktail, in outpatients with Covid-19. N Engl J Med 2021;384:238-251. 
  • Chen P, Nirula A, Heller B, et al. SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody LY-CoV555 in outpatients with Covid-19. N Engl J Med 2021;384:229-237. 
  • Gottlieb RL, Nirula A, Chen P, et al. Effect of Bamlanivimab as Monotherapy or in Combination With Etesevimab on Viral Load in Patients With Mild to Moderate COVID-19: A Randomized Clinical Trial.JAMA. Published online January 21, 2021. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.0202 
  • An EUA for Bamlanivimab—A Monoclonal Antibody for COVID-19. JAMA. Published online December 11, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.24415 
  • Monoclonal Antibodies: Update on this COVID-19 Experimental Therapy  https://discoverysedge.mayo.edu/2021/02/17/monoclonal-antibodies-update-on-this-covid-19-experimental-therapy/ 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd

February 16, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 65: Restoring Function for Long-Haulers

Guest: Greg Vanichkachorn, M.D., M.P.H.

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

For some patients who have had COVID-19, symptoms of the disease may last long after the infection is over. Long-haulers syndrome due to COVID-19 could include profound fatigue, shortness of breath, and long-term neurological complaints, including headache, dizziness, or weakness. Mayo Clinic has launched the COVID Activity Rehabilitation Program, or CARP, to help these patients return to daily life and work. CARP is not just for folks who are trying to get back to work, but for anyone trying to get back to their baseline life.

In this episode, Dr. Greg Vanichkachorn, a Mayo Clinic preventive, occupational and aerospace medicine specialist who leads the CARP program, gives an overview of COVID long haulers and how post-COVID symptoms affects patients. He also shares the goals and results of Mayo Clinic CARP program.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

February 9, 2021

Answers From the Lab: The Impact of COVID-19 Variants

This episode is shared from Answers from the Lab and was originally published February 2, 2021. 

Guest: Matthew J. Binnicker, Ph.D. (@DrMattBinnicker)

Host: William G. Morice, II M.D., Ph.D. (@moricemdphd)

Matthew Binnicker, Ph.D., vice chair of practice for Mayo Clinic's Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, joins William Morice II, M.D., Ph.D., president of Mayo Clinic Laboratories, for this week's "Answers From the Lab" leadership update. In this episode, Dr. Binnicker and Dr. Morice discuss the impact that emerging COVID-19 variants could have on virus testing, vaccine and spread.

For more, follow the Mayo Clinic Labs on Twitter @mayocliniclabs or visit https://news.mayocliniclabs.com/podcast/answers-from-the-lab/ to check out all of their episodes.

February 9, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 64: Leveraging Community Care for Scalable Outpatient Management of COVID-19

Guest: Ravindra Ganesh, M.B.B.S., M.D.

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

The Mayo Clinic COVID Frontline Healthcare Team (CFCT) is an integrated team comprised of doctors and support staff, including nurses, remote monitoring technicians, medical assistants, and desk staff. These teams are responsible for evidence-based management of all newly diagnosed COVID-19 patients. We’re joined by CFCT Codirector Ravindra Ganesh, M.B.B.S., M.D., to discuss the essential roles of CFCT’s during the pandemic.

Topics include how they:

  1. Notify all patients who receive a COVID positive test result in Mayo/Mayo Clinic Health service in the Midwest region through phone call or portal messaging with attached questionnaire
  2. Conduct outpatient monitoring and follow-up as well as identify patient at high risk for decompensation
  3. Prevent COVID positive patients from coming to the Mayo Clinic facilities by remote monitoring and risk assessment
  4. Reinforce social isolation recommendations from public health to all COVID positive patients and assess safety to come off isolation

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

February 8, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 63: Mayo Clinic Q&A - #AskTheMayoMom about Sports Participation During COVID-19

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in February, 2021

To claim credit visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/covid19podcast 

Guest:  David B. Soma, M.D. (@DrDaveSoma); Talha Niaz, M.B.B.S.

Host: Angela C. Mattke, M.D. (@DrAngelaMattke)

There are many benefits to sports participation for children and adolescents. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic, activities such as youth sports have been put on hold or modified to decrease the spread of COVID-19. Also, the scientific community is learning about when it is safe to return to sports participation following COVID-19 infection.  

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, "Ask the Mayo Mom" host and Mayo Clinic pediatrician, Dr. Angela Mattke is joined by Dr. David Soma, a pediatric sports medicine physician at Mayo Clinic Children's Center, to discuss sports participation during the COVID-19 pandemic and what you need to know about return to play after COVID-19 infection. Also joining Drs. Mattke and Soma is Dr. Talha Niaz, a pediatric cardiologist at Mayo Clinic. 

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd

February 4, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 62: Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Virus, Variants and Vaccines Update

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in February, 2021

To claim credit visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/covid19podcast 

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@DrGregPoland)

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)   

When it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, says there's some good news. "Case numbers are falling, masking and distancing do work, and we can control this if we do it right." 

 

However, the not so good news is that variants are showing up in over 30 countries and are reportedly more transmissible. There also seems to be a reduction in vaccine efficacy against the new variants. 

"This is a desperate race between vaccine and virus, between time and opportunity, and we dare not lose that opportunity," emphasizes Dr. Poland. 

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses how COVID-19 viruses mutate into new variants. He also discusses recent COVID-19 research conducted by the NFL, plus he touches on the future of individualized vaccines. "I can see the development of a coronavirus vaccine against multiple types of coronavirus, including the one that causes the common cold, and very likely combine that with the influenza vaccine."

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

February 4, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 61: Mayo Clinic Q&A: Picking Up the Pace With Rollout of COVID-19 Vaccines

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in January, 2021. 

To claim credit visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/covid19podcast 

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland) 

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd

The distribution kinks for COVID-19 vaccines are getting ironed out, says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group.

"It's a logistics nightmare, but now you're seeing a plan to administer 1 million doses a day and I think that's very achievable," says Dr. Poland. "And the production of the vaccine is just going to accelerate."

Dr. Poland also repeats the reminders about preventing transmission of COVID-19:

  • Wear a mask.
  • Wash your hands.
  • Keep your social distance. 

"The current estimates are that in the next four weeks, we'll probably have about another 100,000 deaths," adds Dr. Poland. "It's stunning when you think about 1 out of every 860 Americans has now died of this."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland talks more about the rollout, transmission and herd immunity, as well as fertility issues related to COVID-19, survivor brain fog and more.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd