Category: Education

Timely consultations relevant for family medicine, primary care, and general internal medicine topics for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and residents. Offering CME credit for most episodes at https://ce.mayo.edu/podcast. Produced by @MayoMedEd.

October 26, 2021

Preserving Sight with Macular Degeneration

Guest: Sophie J. Bakri, M.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Macular degeneration is the most common cause of vision loss in individuals over the age of 50. The loss of central vision from macular degeneration can result in significant lifestyle changes in patients. They may no longer be able to read, write or drive. In this podcast, we’ll discuss macular degeneration with Sophie Bakri, M.D., an ophthalmologist at Mayo Clinic. She’ll review the two types and pathology of macular degeneration, its presentation, risk factors and preventive strategies, and new treatments on the horizon.

Specific topics:

  • Pathologic changes in macular degeneration
  • Vision loss associated with macular degeneration
  • Possible causes of macular degeneration
  • Risk factors
  • Typical course of macular degeneration
  • The difference between wet and dry macular degeneration
  • Treatment strategies
  • Preventive strategies

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

October 22, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: Changing COVID-19 recommendations means the science is working

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in October, 2021

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)

As continuing research guides medical recommendations, it seems that there are COVID-19 updates released daily. These recommendations cover a range of topics, including whether COVID-19 booster vaccinations are necessary to whether COVID-19 vaccines can be mixed and matched.

"The fact that recommendations are changing is not evidence people don't know what they're doing," says Dr. Gregory Poland, head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "It's evidence that they do know what they're doing and are paying close attention to new data that's coming along. Then they're adjusting recommendations based on the latest data."

Dr. Poland continues to urge people to get the latest COVID-19 news from credible sources. 

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland walks through the recent recommendations, corrects misperceptions and answers a number of listener questions.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

October 21, 2021

Genes & Your Health Edition - Cell-Free DNA: Implications in Practice

To claim credit for this episode, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Genes & Your Health

Guests: Minetta C. Liu, M.D.; Myra J. Wick, M.D., Ph.D. (@MyraWickMD)

Host: Denise M. Dupras, M.D., Ph.D.

What is cell-free DNA? How does this type of DNA interact with our body? How is it useful in the clinical setting? Advances in technologies has expanded our understanding of cell-free DNA and its implications. Where are we now and what can we look for in the future? Find out these answers and more in the seventh episode of the Genes & Your Health miniseries from the Center for Individualized Medicine.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

October 19, 2021

A Neurologist’s Take on Syncope

Guest: Paola Sandroni, M.D., Ph.D.

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

Syncope is defined as the sudden and transient loss of consciousness and postural tone due to global reduction of blood flow to the reticular activating system. Syncopal episodes are followed by a rapid and spontaneous recovery.  Joining us today is Paola Sandroni, M.D., Ph.D., a neurologist at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester Campus. She will help us sort through the complicated subject of syncope, including its main etiologies and how to distinguish which is affecting your patient. She also outlines the nuances of evidence-based evaluation of syncope, which is largely guided by the patient’s presentation.

Additional resources:

  • Thiruganasambandamoorthy V, Kwong K, Wells GA, Sivilotti MLA, Mukarram M, Rowe BH, Lang E, Perry JJ, Sheldon R, Stiell IG, Taljaard M. Development of the Canadian Syncope Risk Score to predict serious adverse events after emergency department assessment of syncope. CMAJ. 2016 Sep 6;188(12):E289-E298. doi: 1503/cmaj.151469. Epub 2016 Jul 4. PMID: 27378464; PMCID: PMC5008955

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

October 14, 2021

Genes & Your Health Edition - Why Does It Matter? Genes, Hormones, and Women’s Health

To claim credit for this episode, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Genes & Your Health

Guests: Stephanie S. Faubion, M.D., M.B.A. (@StephFaubionMD); Kejal Kantarci, M.D. (@KejalKantarciMD); Juliana (Jewel) M. Kling, M.D., M.P.H. (@DrJewelKling)

Host: Denise M. Dupras, M.D., Ph.D.

Is hormone therapy good or bad for women? What are the myths surrounding it? Is the varying experience of menopause genetic? Join the sixth episode of Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine’s Genes & Your Health Edition to dive into women’s health and hormones and what you need to know for your practice.  

Additional resources:
• USPSTF Recommendations Statement for Breast Cancer: Medication Use to Reduce Risk https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/breast-cancer-medications-for-risk-reduction 
• Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine: https://www.mayo.edu/research/centers-programs/center-individualized-medicine 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd. 

October 12, 2021

Using Artificial Intelligence to Combat COVID-19

Guest: Thomas Caulfield, Ph.D.

Host: Amit K Ghosh, M.D., MBA (@AmitGhosh006)

In this podcast, Dr. Thomas Caulfield from Mayo Clinic Florida describes a novel approach for SARS-CoV2 multi-drug targeting using artificial intelligence. Dr. Caulfield is leading a national team of investigators from Harvard, University of California, In Vivo Biosystems and Mayo Clinic to perform large-scale in silico and in vivo experiments on de novo drugs to better understand COVID-19 and halt its progression.  University of California hosts a live virus BSL3 facility for rapidly screening novel compounds that Dr. Caulfield's lab designs in silico and refines with feedback using machine learning techniques and data layering.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

October 7, 2021

Genes & Your Health Edition - How Does Your Microbiome Impact Your Health?

To claim credit for this series, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Genes & Your Health

Guest: Purna C. Kashyap, M.B.B.S. (@KashyapPurna); Marina R. Walther-Antonio, Ph.D.
Host: Denise M. Dupras, M.D., Ph.D.

What is the microbiome? How does the microbiome interact with our body? How much of us is nurture, how much is nature? The whole concept of microbiome may be a new idea but have no fear this fifth episode of the Genes & Your Health Edition from the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine is here to help answer those questions and more!

Additional resources:

  • Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine: https://www.mayo.edu/research/centers-programs/center-individualized-medicine 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd. 

October 6, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: Breaking Down COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Approvals

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in September 29, 2021

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)

The path to approvals for a booster dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine has seemed complicated. 

"This is a confusing set of recommendations," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "So let's look at the four groups approved for only the Pfizer booster, thus far. If you got a primary series of the Pfizer vaccine, you're 65 and older, and it's been six months or more, you are eligible for a booster. If you're 50–64 and you have medical conditions that place you at high risk, you are eligible for the booster. If you're 18–49, you may be able to get a booster based on a medical condition and if you talk with your health care provider to weigh risks and benefits. And, finally, for people 18–64 years old, who are health care providers in congregate living situations or who have occupations that place them at high risk for transmission, such as school teachers, they also may be eligible. That should happen very soon."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland talks more about the approval process for COVID-19 vaccine boosters, including for the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. He also discusses the possibility that emergency use approval for children, down to age 5, could come before the end of October.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

October 5, 2021

Breast Imaging for Patients with Dense Breast Tissue

Guest: Christina A. Dilaveri, M.D. (@CDilaveri)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

 

Breast cancer is very treatable when detected early. Therefore, early detection becomes very important as it significantly reduces a patient’s risk of developing metastases and death. Breast imaging plays an extremely important role in the detection of early breast cancer, and we now have several modalities of breast imaging available, each with its advantages and disadvantages. Our guest for this podcast is Christina Dilaveri, M.D. a breast disease specialist, from Mayo Clinic’s Rochester Campus. We’ll discuss mammography, ultrasound, MRI, and molecular breast imaging, when they’re indicated, and the advantages of each. You’ll hear which patients should have more than a mammogram and how often it should be performed.

Specific topics discussed:

  • The various types of mammography available
  • Indications for breast ultrasound
  • Benefits of breast MRI
  • When breast MRI should be performed
  • Benefits of molecular breast imaging
  • When molecular breast imaging should be performed

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

September 30, 2021

Genes & Your Health Edition - Genomics and Cancer: Primary Care Impact and Research Advances

To claim credit for this series, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Genes & Your Health  

Guest: Niloy Jewel J. Samadder, M.D. (@J_Samadder)  
Host: Denise M. Dupras, M.D., Ph.D.  

Can we find the cause of a patient’s cancer? Is it possible to provide targeted treatment to prevent future cancers by understanding what genetic predispositions a patient or their family members have? In a recently published study, nearly one in six to one in eight cancer patients, depending on which type of cancer they had, carried a genetic predisposition to the development of their cancer. How can we translate these findings into our practice for the benefit of our patients and their families? Tune in to episode four of our Genes & Your Health Edition from the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine.

Additional resources:

  • Samadder NJ, Riegert-Johnson D, Boardman L, et al. Comparison of universal genetic testing vs guideline-directed targeted testing for patients with hereditary cancer syndrome. JAMA Oncol. 2021;7(2):230–237. doi: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.6252
  • Uson, PLS. Riegert-Johnson, D. Boardman, L. Kisiel, J. et al. Germline cancer susceptibility gene testing in unselected patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma: a multicenter prospective study. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2021 April 20; doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2021.04.013
  • Mayo Clinic’s Center for Individualized Medicine: https://www.mayo.edu/research/centers-programs/center-individualized-medicine 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

September 28, 2021

The Evolution of COVID-19 Testing

Guest: Matthew J. Binnicker, Ph.D. (@DrMattBinnicker)

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

 

In this podcast Matthew J. Binnicker, Ph.D. discusses the development of different types of testing available to diagnose SARS-CoV2 infection. Binnicker discusses the test characteristics of the rapid antigen tests and RT-PCR test and its variability based on the time when the test was performed. He also discusses the optimal timing of diagnostic testing (rapid testing, RT-PCR) and the role and limitations of antibody testing in COVID-19.

 

Additional resources:

Shah AS, Tande AJ, Challener DW, O’Horo JC, Binnicker MJ, Berbari EF. Diagnostic stewardship: An essential element in a rapidly evolving COVID-19 pandemic. Mayo Clin Proc. 2020;95(9):S17-S19. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2020.05.039

 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

September 23, 2021

Genes & Your Health Edition - Pharmacogenomics and its Value for Primary Care

To claim credit for this episode, visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/online-education/content/mayo-clinic-talks-podcast-genes-your-health#group-tabs-node-course-default1

Guest: Jessica A. Wright, Pharm.D., R.Ph.

Host: Denise M. Dupras, M.D., Ph.D.

Pharmacogenomics helps to identify how your patients’ DNA may affect their response to medications. But there's a lot of different genes! How do we get started? What resources are out there? Do we have to worry about every drug a patient is on? Find out these answers and more in episode three of the Genes & Your Health Edition from the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine.

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

September 21, 2021

Regenerative Techniques for the Larynx

Guest: David G. Lott, M.D.

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

About 60,000 Americans have had their vocal cords removed due to disease or trauma necessitating a laryngectomy. Post-laryngectomy, patients are unable to speak, are at risk for aspiration, and many suffer from significant anguish resulting in depression. Fortunately, there are several treatment options available, the first being laryngeal transplant. While laryngeal transplantation allows patients to smell, taste, swallow, and communicate, it has drawbacks. Currently only a small number of larynx transplants are done in the U.S., and only a select few patients with laryngectomy qualify for larynx transplant. In this episode, Dr. David Lott, division chair of laryngology at Mayo Clinic’s Arizona campus, discusses the role of regenerative medicine, which has shown promise in using 3D printing and a patient’s stem cells in creating a larynx.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

September 16, 2021

Genes & Your Health Edition - How Does Viral Genetics Influence Transmission, Diagnosis, and Severity of COVID-19?

To claim credit for this series, visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/online-education/content/mayo-clinic-talks-podcast-genes-your-health#group-tabs-node-course-default1

Guests: Andrew D. Badley, M.D. (@BadleyAndrew); Matthew J. Binnicker, Ph.D. (@DrMattBinnicker)

Host: Denise M. Dupras, M.D., Ph.D.

COVID-19. Variants. The future. Does one test fit all?  Will the vaccine continue to provide protection against future variants? What makes the Delta variant more transmissible? Join the second episode of our Genes & Your Health Edition from the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine to learn how viral genetics influence transmission, diagnosis, and severity of COVID-19.

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

September 14, 2021

Genes & Your Health Edition - Genomics and Healthcare, Why Does it Matter?

To claim credit for this episode, visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/online-education/content/mayo-clinic-talks-podcast-genes-your-health#group-tabs-node-course-default1

Guests: Matthew J. Ferber, Ph.D. (@Matt_Ferber); Teresa M. Kruisselbrink, M.S., CGC (@T_Kruisselbrink); William C. Palmer, M.D. (@williampalmermd)

Host: Denise M. Dupras, M.D., Ph.D.

For so long we've heard Genetic Testing is coming. Well guess what, it’s here!  We have over 25 million people who have chosen to participate in direct-to-consumer testing alone. What does this mean for primary care, and does it matter? Find out in the first episode of our Genes & Your Health Edition from the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine.

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

September 7, 2021

Variants, Virulence, and Vaccines, Oh My!

Guest: Elitza S. Theel, Ph.D. (@ElliTheelPhD)

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

Dr. Elitza Theel, Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and Director of Infectious Diseases Serology Laboratory at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester Campus, discusses our immune response to vaccination and natural infection and outlines the different types of antibody assays currently available. Dr. Theel also discusses the concept of herd immunity in the context of different circulating SARS-CoV-2 variants and the increased need to get higher rates of vaccination in the community as the infectivity and transmissibility of circulating SARS-CoV-2 variants changes. We also discuss the status of correlates of protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2 and the need for booster vaccine doses for immunocompromised individuals. 

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

August 31, 2021

Evaluating Hematuria

Guest: Aaron M. Potretzke, M.D. (@potretzke)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Microscopic hematuria, and less commonly gross hematuria, are conditions commonly seen by the primary care provider. Malignancy is the most ominous cause of hematuria. Fortunately, other causes are much more likely. Since this is a relatively common health condition, when should we investigate hematuria and what should the evaluation consist of? How do we evaluate a patient’s risk for urinary tract malignancy? Dr. Aaron Potretzke, a urologist at Mayo Clinic joins us to discuss these questions.

Specific topics:

  • Definition of hematuria
  • Benign causes of hematuria
  • Risk of malignancy in low, medium, and high-risk patients
  • Stratifying malignancy risk in patients for genitourinary malignancy
  • Recommended evaluation for patients with hematuria
  • How to manage patients with persistent hematuria despite a negative evaluation
  • Role of urine cytology in the evaluation of hematuria

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

August 24, 2021

Exercise is First-Line Treatment for Your Parkinson’s Patients

Guest: Edward R. Laskowski, M.D. (@DrEdSportsMed)

Host: Sanjeev (Sanj) Kakar, M.D. (@sanjkakar)

Daily exercise has so many health and emotional benefits – it can help decrease your blood pressure, promote cardiovascular wellbeing, alleviate stress, and assist with weight loss and blood sugar control. Parkinson’s disease is a condition that affects the central nervous system, and in particular the brain, that can lead to shakiness, poor balance, and frequent falls. Joining us in this episode is Edward Laskowski, M.D., a professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation and sports medicine specialist at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester Campus, to discuss why exercise is first-line treatment for your Parkinson’s patients.

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

August 17, 2021

Parkinson’s Disease - It’s More Than Just a Tremor

Guest: Jeremy K. Cutsforth-Gregory, M.D. (@JCGneuro)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Parkinson’s Disease is one of the more common neurodegenerative diseases, in fact, patients with Parkinson’s outnumber those with multiple sclerosis, ALS, and muscular dystrophy combined. It tends to affect older patients, although on rare occasions it can be seen in those under the age of 50. It can have a devastating effect on an individual’s lifestyle as the physical symptoms of the disease tend to gradually progress over years. This podcast will feature Dr. Jeremy Cutsforth-Gregory, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic, as we discuss the evaluation and management of Parkinson’s Disease.

Specific topics:

  • Pathophysiology of Parkinson’s Disease
  • Common presenting symptoms of Parkinson’s
  • Assessing patients with tremor
  • Complications of advanced Parkinson’s
  • Pharmacologic management of Parkinson’s

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

August 10, 2021

Working from the Ground Up to Impact Gender Disparities in COVID-19

Guest: Carol L. Kuhle, D.O., M.P.H. (@clkejd)

Host: Anjali Bhagra, M.D. (@anjalibhagramd)

Anjali Bhagra, M.D., and Carol L. Kuhle, D.O., M.P.H., discuss the narrative they recently published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, which outlines and highlights the further widening of preexisting gender disparities in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. What can we do to identify and mitigate these issues?

Additional resources:

  • Nordhues, HC. Bhagra, A. Stroud, NN. Vencill, JA. Kuhle, CL. COVID-19 gender disparities and mitigation recommendations: a narrative review. Mayo Clin Proc. 2021 April 20; 96(7): 1907-1920. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2021.04.009

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

August 6, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: The COVID-19 Delta Variant has Changed Everything

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded August, 2021

Guest: Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)  

A fourth COVID-19 surge is blanketing the U.S., and the delta variant is the culprit.

"Where did this delta variant come from? It came from unvaccinated people getting infected in large numbers allowing the virus to continue mutating," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group.

In the past, a person with COVID-19 might infect two to four people. But with the delta variant, one person can infect nine people, according to Dr. Poland. He says if you want to protect yourself and your family, wear a mask, especially indoors, and get vaccinated with an appropriate series of one of the COVID-19 vaccines.

"These are the most studied vaccines in the history of the world," Dr. Poland emphasizes. "There have never been this many people who have received this many doses of vaccines during this amount of time with as much scrutiny as these COVID-19 vaccines have had."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland answers questions about a person's waning immunity and the likelihood of COVID-19 booster shots. He also explains the two phases of immunity and goes into detail about the extensive Federal Drug Administration license approval process for COVID-19 vaccines.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

August 3, 2021

Will We Be Replaced by Computers? Artificial Intelligence and Medicine

Guest: Steve G. Peters, M.D.

Host: Sanjeev Kakar, M.D. (@sanjkakar)

No doubt you’ve heard the term “artificial intelligence,” by now; but what is it exactly? How can medicine use AI to improve patient care and outcomes? Will it one day replace doctors’ years of training? Steve Peters, M.D. a pulmonary and critical care medicine consultant, with a special interest in AI, at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. Dr. Peters will help us take a look into the not-so-distant future as we explore AI and its role in medicine.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

July 30, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: Stopping the Spiral of the COVID-19 Delta Variant

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded July, 2021

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)   

Transmission of the COVID-19 delta variant is increasing.

"We're in this constant spiral, right now,” says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group.

“The delta variant is so highly contagious,” he says. “The number of delta viral particles in the upper respiratory system is reportedly 1,000 times higher than with the original COVID-19 virus. If we can't find ways to get people vaccinated, we are going to be in a world of hurt. And I don't say that to be alarmist. I say it to be a realist, based on what’s happening right in front of us.”

But Dr. Poland says the spiral can be stopped by getting higher rates of immunization. 

"Getting a COVID-19 vaccine will prevent the development of worse and worse variants. It will prevent severe cases of hospitalization and death, even in the face of a variant,” he says. "The alternative is to lose another 600,000-plus Americans. Only this time it will, unfortunately, involve younger people."

Dr. Poland explains further, "Every time somebody gets infected with the delta variant, there's the opportunity for that virus to mutate and transmit to other people," says Dr. Poland. "This means that immunization rates to control herd immunity will probably have to be in the 85% to 95% range."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland continues to talk about the delta variant, breakthrough infections, booster shots and much more.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

July 27, 2021

What’s That Sound? Maybe It’s Stridor

Guest: Shelagh A. Cofer, M.D. (@ShelaghCoferMD)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Stridor is a musical sound due to disrupted airflow in an individual’s airway. In many instances it’s due to a benign cause but it can also represent a serious problem, possibly even life-threatening. In today’s podcast, we’ll learn about the various causes of stridor and when we need to be concerned that it represents a serious health issue. Our guest for this podcast is Dr. Shelagh Cofer, a pediatric otolaryngology specialist at the Mayo Clinic. We’ll discuss how stridor differs from wheezing, the most common causes of stridor in both children and adults and what symptoms we should be watching for that might suggest a serious cause for stridor. We’ll also cover the evaluation of patients with stridor, which imaging studies may be helpful and when an ENT consultation is warranted.

Specific topics:

  • Definition of stridor
  • Difference between stridor, stertor, and wheezing
  • Most common causes of stridor in both children and adults
  • Croup as a form of stridor
  • Important questions we should be asking our patients about stridor to identify those at risk for airway obstruction – including the SPECS-R mnemonic
  • Tests and imaging studies which may be helpful in the evaluation of a patient with stridor
  • Treatments for the more common causes of stridor

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

July 22, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: On the Verge of Predicted COVID-19 Surge with Delta Variant

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded July, 2021

Guest:  Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)   

The delta variant is being blamed for hot spots in the U.S. where cases of COVID-19 are on the rise. These hot spots account for most cases in the U.S. They are also the geographical areas that tend to have the lowest vaccination rates. 

"It's no surprise that the two go together," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group.

"This (delta variant) is the bad actor that we predicted it would be," adds Dr. Poland. "Our seven-day average is getting up to 19,000 cases a day in the U.S. We were down to 3,000. So we're starting to see, just as we predicted, a surge as people took masks off and as restrictions were lifted before we had achieved high rates of immunization."

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland expands on how the highly transmissible delta variant continues to spread. He also talks about the possibility of COVID-19 vaccine boosters, explains how the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System works, and much more as he answers listener questions.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.