Category: Education

Timely consultations relevant for family medicine, primary care, and general internal medicine topics for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and residents. Offering CME credit for most episodes at https://ce.mayo.edu/podcast. Produced by @MayoMedEd.

May 19, 2022

Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 news update

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in May 2022

Guest: Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)

The widespread availability of at-home COVID-19 tests have made it easier for people to know if they have the virus, and to take measures to protect themselves and others. But there is a downside. Because the majority of tests are now done at home and often not reported, the official counts on COVID-19 infection rates are not as accurate as they have been in past waves of the virus. 

"Because the majority of testing is being done at home, we can no longer tell you accurately about the positivity rate for a given community for a given state like we used to be able to," explains Dr. Gregory Poland, head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "And this is problematic. It means that we lose our ability to understand what's called genetic epidemiology — the ability to trace how these variants are moving, how fast they're moving, and whether they're changing and evolving into yet different subvariants or new variants. We've lost that ability now."

The most recent omicron subvariant, BA 2.12.1, has cases on the rise again and the U.S. passed a tragic milestone last week, reaching 1 million COVID-19 deaths in the country.

In an effort to capture a more accurate picture, the latest tool being used by public health officials to track COVID-19 infection rates is wastewater surveillance. By looking for the presence of the COVID-19 virus shed by people, wastewater surveillance can give a more accurate picture of how much virus is in the community. This detects virus not only from those who test at home, but also from people who are asymptomatic and, therefore, didn't get tested.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the current state of COVID-19 in the U.S., including what we know about the latest subvariants.

May 17, 2022

Evaluating Adrenal Incidentalomas

Guest: Irina Bancos, M.D. (@IrinaBancos)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

The widespread use of CT and MRI scans has resulted in frequent serendipitous findings, including adrenal nodules. When these nodules are found, two questions need to be answered. Is the nodule malignant and is this nodule metabolically active? This podcast will address these incidentally found adrenal nodules, also known as adrenal incidentalomas. We’ll review when these nodules should be investigated, the likelihood they represent a malignancy and how to assess if they’re metabolically active. Our guest for this podcast is Irina Bancos, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

May 12, 2022

Eating Disorders Edition: Adult Eating Disorders

To claim credit for this episode, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Eating Disorders Edition

Guest(s):   Scott Crow, M.D.; Carol B. Peterson, Ph.D., L.P.

Host:  Jocelyn R. Lebow, Ph.D., L.P.

While eating disorders are often thought of as disorders of adolescence, they impact adult patients across their lifespan. While many of the characteristics of these disorders are similar for pediatric vs. adult patients, there are important differences in how a primary care provider should assess and treat these illnesses in adults. As with younger patients, most adults report presenting initially to their primary care provider with their eating concerns, and many never seek additional care. This episode focuses on best practices for primary care providers in assessing and treating adult patients with eating disorders. Our guests are Scott Crow, M.D., Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Minnesota and Vice President of Psychiatry at Accanto Health, and Carol B. Peterson, Ph.D., L.P., Clinical Psychologist and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Minnesota.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

May 10, 2022

The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Treatment of COVID-19

Guest: Raymund R. Razonable, M.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-synthesized and mimic our immune system in fighting harmful pathogens. In addition to convalescent plasma and anti-viral medication, monoclonal antibodies have played an important role in the treatment of infections due to COVID-19. The use of monoclonal antibodies has been shown to shorten the duration of symptoms as well as reduce the risk of hospitalization and mortality due to COVID-19. This podcast will focus on monoclonal antibodies and our guest is Raymund R. Razonable, M.D., from the Division of Infectious Disease at the Mayo Clinic.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

Resource:

  • O’Horo J, Challener DW, Anderson RJ, Arndt RF, Ausman SE, Hall ST, Heyliger A, Kennedy BD, Sweeten PW, Ganesh R, Razonable RR, Rates of Severe Outcomes After Bamlanivimab-Etesevimab and Casirivimab-Imdevimab Treatment of High-Risk Patients With Mild to Moderate Coronavirus Disease-2019, Mayo Clinic Proceedings (2022), doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2022.02.009.
May 6, 2022

Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 news update

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in April 2022

Guest: Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)

An estimated 3 out of 4 U.S. children and more than half of all adults have been infected with COVID-19, according to a report released on Tuesday, April 26 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But a Mayo Clinic expert says more information is needed to get the complete picture.

"This was a convenient sample. In other words, people who were having blood drawn for other reasons were tested,"explains Dr. Gregory Poland, head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "That does not reflect the full population or differences by race or geographic location. And the detection of antibodies does not necessarily mean that you are protected from infection. So, there's a lot of nuance around understanding that headline."

The research study looked at more than 200,000 blood samples and found that signs of past infection rose dramatically during the omicron surge between December 2021 and February.

Other COVID-19 news this week includes a push to make treatments more available, the rising incidence of new omicron subvariants, and changes in mask recommendations. Dr. Poland cautions that COVID-19 is still present and encourages wearing a mask in crowded spaces, even when there isn't a requirement to do so.

"If only one of us is wearing a mask and the other one isn't and is infected, you still have pretty high protection — but not the same level of protection as if both of us wearing one," says Dr. Poland. "So, it's it is not futile to be the only one wearing a mask. In fact, I think it sends a message."

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the latest COVID-19 news and answers listener questions.

May 5, 2022

Eating Disorders Edition: Case Discussions

To claim credit for this episode, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Eating Disorders Edition

Guests:  Angela C. Mattke, M.D. (@DrAngelaMattke); Paige I. Partain, M.D.

Host:  Jocelyn R. Lebow, Ph.D., L.P.

Though the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM–5) is clear in classifying eating disorders, clinicians understand it is rare to be presented with a straightforward case. Patients present with comorbidities and family circumstances that muddy the clinical picture and the treatment plan. This case-based episode focuses on how primary care providers can treat children with eating disorders. This episode will examine complicated eating disorder cases, featuring guests Angela C. Mattke, M.D. and Paige I. Partain, M.D., Mayo Clinic Children’s Center pediatricians, and colleagues and collaborators in the primary care child and adolescent eating disorder clinic at Mayo Clinic.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

May 3, 2022

Fragility Fractures

Guest: Ann E. Kearns, M.D., Ph.D.         

Host: Sanjeev (Sanj) Kakar, M.D. (@sanjkakar)

It is estimated that worldwide, one in three women, and one in five men over the age of 50 will experience osteoporosis fractures during their lifetimes. In this podcast, we discuss risk factors and management of fragility fractures and bone health with Ann E. Kearns, M.D., Ph.D., a Consultant Endocrinologist and Associate Professor within the Department of Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 28, 2022

Eating Disorders Edition: Basic Principles of Treatment for the Primary Care Provider

To claim credit for this episode, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Eating Disorders Edition

Guests:  Angela C. Mattke, M.D. (@DrAngelaMattke); Paige I. Partain, M.D.

Host:  Jocelyn R. Lebow, Ph.D., L.P.

We understand eating disorders are serious and evidence-based Family Based Treatment (FBT) is scarce but effective. This episode will discuss strategies informed by evidence based FBT principles that can be used by providers in primary care settings to address eating disorder symptoms. Though typically the responsibilities of primary care providers in eating disorder treatment are limited to case identification, referral, and medical management, these providers have vast experience empowering caregivers to help their children change behavior.  Equipping primary care providers to deliver evidence-based treatment for restrictive eating disorders has the potential to expand access to early intervention and improve outcomes.

Our guests for this episode are Angela C. Mattke, M.D. and Paige I. Partain, M.D., Mayo Clinic Children’s Center pediatricians, and colleagues and collaborators in the primary care child and adolescent eating disorder clinic at Mayo Clinic.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

 

April 26, 2022

The Use of Race in Clinical Algorithms

Guest: Ramla N. Kasozi, M.B., Ch.B., M.P.H.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

There is currently a debate regarding the use of race and ethnic categories in clinical decision-making. There are numerous studies which claim data from race is a factor and should be considered when designing practice guidelines and clinical algorithms. Some feel that any benefit is small compared to the potential harm that could occur regarding the past abuse of race used in medicine. Unfortunately, many questions remain unanswered. Is race a reliable proxy for genetic differences? Are there genetic differences which explain the basis behind race-based algorithms? And what are the potential dangers of using race-adjusted algorithms? This podcast reviews these topics with Ramla N. Kasozi, M.B., Ch.B., M.P.H., a family physician at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 21, 2022

Eating Disorders Edition: Treatment for Eating Disorders

To claim credit for this episode, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Eating Disorders Edition

Guest(s):  Jocelyn R. Lebow, Ph.D., L.P.

Host:  Angela C. Mattke, M.D. (@DrAngelaMattke)

Eating disorders impact an estimated 3-15% of adolescents and, if left untreated, or only partially treated, can become chronic conditions. Relapse is also common in eating disorders with over 40% of patients reporting at least one relapse in some studies. Despite these sobering statistics, when adolescent patients complete a course of good, evidence-based treatment, they can expect to make and maintain a full recovery from their symptoms. Primary care providers play a critical role in helping patients and their families find care and determine whether the care they’re getting is having the right effect. This episode will concentrate on different types of eating disorder treatment: what’s out there and what the evidence says works best. Our guest is Jocelyn R. Lebow, Ph.D., L.P., a Mayo Clinic child and adolescent psychologist and collaborator in the Mayo Clinic primary care child and adolescent eating disorder clinic.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 19, 2022

Secondary Hypertension: Identifying Clues in Patients

Guest: Sandra J. Taler, M.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD) 

Nearly half of all adults in the United States have some degree of hypertension and it’s one of the most common reasons patients are seen in an outpatient practice. The vast majority have essential or primary hypertension and they usually respond to a combination of lifestyle changes and often pharmacologic therapy. A small percentage of these cases have secondary hypertension and often do not respond to treatment unless the underlying cause is found and corrected. At times, it can be difficult to identify the cause of secondary hypertension as the clues may be quite subtle or even non-existent. Our guest for today’s podcast is Sandra J. Taler, M.D. from the Division of Nephrology and a hypertension specialist from the Mayo Clinic. We’ll discuss when you should suspect secondary hypertension, the clues the patient may give us regarding its cause and its management.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 14, 2022

Eating Disorders Edition: Medical Management of Eating Disorders in Primary Care

To claim credit for this episode, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Eating Disorders Edition

Guests:  Marcie L. Billings, M.D.; Paige I. Partain, M.D.

Host:  Angela C. Mattke, M.D. (@DrAngelaMattke)

The medical evaluation for eating disorders is very important. It is the primary care provider’s role to rule out other causes of weight loss, especially when eating disorder signs might not be as apparent at the beginning or the patient isn’t entirely forthcoming. Additionally, the patient and their family have an inherent trust in a primary care provider as their long-term medical provider. This episode will focus on the medical evaluation and management of eating disorders – what vital signs are significant, what labs are necessary including how often they should be performed, how frequently patients need to be seen in collaboration with their therapist, and how to determine if a patient is medically unstable and needing immediate admission for monitoring and treatment. The guests for this episode are Marcie L. Billings, M.D. and Paige I. Partain, M.D., Mayo Clinic Children’s Center pediatricians, and colleagues and collaborators in the primary care child and adolescent eating disorder clinic at Mayo Clinic. 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 12, 2022

Treating Hypertension: Doing What’s Best for Your Patient

Guest: Ivan E. Porter, II M.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Nearly half of all adults in the United States have hypertension and it’s one of the most common reasons for an outpatient visit. Despite this, it’s estimated that only about a fourth of those diagnosed with hypertension are adequately controlled and about 20% of adults with hypertension are unaware that they even have it. Since uncontrolled hypertension can increase the risk of cerebral, cardiac and renal events, it’s important to make an accurate diagnosis and appropriately manage patients with the condition. The topic for this podcast is hypertension and we’ll discuss the changes in blood pressure with aging, the definition of hypertension, the proper technique of checking blood pressure and helpful management techniques with today’s guest, Ivan E. Porter, II M.D., a nephrologist and hypertension specialist at the Mayo Clinic.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 7, 2022

Eating Disorders Edition: Identification and Assessment of Eating Disorders for the Primary Care Provider

To claim credit for this episode, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Eating Disorders Edition

Guest:  Paige I. Partain, M.D.

Host:  Jocelyn R. Lebow, Ph.D., L.P.

Child and adolescent eating disorders are serious diseases, characterized by a range of physical and psychological consequences. They are often associated with a chronic course and numerous relapses. This episode focuses on how primary care providers can assess for and identify eating disorders in child and adolescent patients. We will discuss high yield assessment questions and tools that you can use in your primary care practice when you suspect a young patient may meet the criteria for an eating disorder. Our guest is Paige I. Partain, M.D., Mayo Clinic Children’s Center pediatrician and collaborator in the primary care child and adolescent eating disorder clinic at Mayo Clinic.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 5, 2022

Eating Disorders Edition: Eating Disorders 101: Background and Debunking Myths

To claim credit for this episode, visit: Mayo Clinic Talks Podcast: Eating Disorders Edition

Guest:  Jocelyn R. Lebow, Ph.D., L.P.

Host:  Angela C. Mattke, M.D. (@DrAngelaMattke)

Eating disorders are a huge problem in our country. Whether realizing it or not, primary care providers who treat teenagers are likely caring for patients with eating disorders.  Though estimates vary, approximately 3-15% of adolescents will experience an eating disorder. Along with the numerous physical and psychological consequences of these illnesses, eating disorders also have the second-highest mortality rate of any mental illness: one in five patients will die from complications related to their eating disorder. 

This episode is the first episode in our Eating Disorders edition, which focuses on how primary care providers may treat children with eating disorders. This episode will concentrate on the basics: what are eating disorders, what do they do to our patients, and what myths and misunderstandings exist that hinder effective identification and treatment. Our guest is Jocelyn R. Lebow, Ph.D., L.P., a Mayo Clinic child and adolescent psychologist, and collaborator in the Mayo Clinic primary care child and adolescent eating disorder clinic.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 31, 2022

Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 metrics improve, expert still urges caution

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in March 2022

Guest: Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)

Hospitalizations and deaths due to COVID-19 continue to decline, leading to some optimism about the way forward from pandemic to endemic. But experts still urge caution as the omicron subvariant, named BA.2, has quickly become the dominant strain in the U.S.

"When you look around the nation, all of the metrics, with the exception of BA.2, have fallen precipitously," explains Dr. Gregory Poland, head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "But we need to be very cautious about pretending that the pandemic is over."

Dr. Poland explains that each time there has been a waning number of COVID-19 infections, people have let down their guard and relaxed precautions, which has led to another surge. Dr. Poland still recommends masking in crowded indoor settings and urges people to be fully vaccinated and boosted against COVID-19 to reduce the chance of infection.

"We're just coming down into a quiet period," says Dr. Poland. "But every time we've seen this set of markers in the past, we've had a new variant that's caused a surge. The question is, will it be BA.2, one of the newer variants that have been identified, or something completely unexpected? We just don't know."

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the latest COVID-19 news including potential changes to booster recommendations, data on vaccine protection for pregnant women, and the latest information on COVID-19 vaccines for children under 5.

 

March 29, 2022

Colorectal Cancer – Screening Guidelines Updates

Guest: John B. Kisiel, M.D. (@DrJohnKisiel)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly occurring cancer for both men and women and ranks second to lung cancer as a cause of cancer mortality. Yet it’s estimated that up to one quarter of eligible adults in the United States have never been screened for colorectal cancer and nearly one third are not up to date with their screening. We now have a variety of accepted screening tests for colorectal cancer and each carries its own risks and benefits. This podcast will review colorectal cancer screening, including when we should start screening, the various available screening tests, as well as their advantages and limitations. Our guest for this episode is gastroenterologist, Dr. John Kisiel from the Mayo Clinic.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 22, 2022

Post COVID Syndrome

Guest: Greg Vanichkachorn, M.D., M.P.H. (@DoctorGregVan)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

While most patients who have COVID-19 completely recover within a few weeks, there are some patients who continue to experience symptoms that can last for months. These patients may require our care for an extended period of time.  Although much has been learned about COVID-19 over the past couple of years, there is still a great deal that’s not known. The topic for this podcast is post-COVID syndrome and our guest is Greg Vanichkachorn, M.D., M.P.H., a preventive medicine physician and specialist in Public Health. We’ll discuss the typical symptoms, duration of symptoms, and who is most likely to develop post-COVID syndrome.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 17, 2022

Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 Update

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in March 2022

Guest: Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)

Last week marked two years since the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 to be a pandemic. While infection rates and hospitalizations in the U.S. continue to decline, there are some areas of concern globally.

"China, Hong Kong, Ireland, the U.K. and Denmark are seeing surges back up again," explains Dr. Gregory Poland, head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "These countries, many of us experts believe, prematurely dropped mask-wearing and nonpharmaceutical interventions, and really have stopped pushing and encouraging people to get vaccinated. I think that's a mistake."

Dr. Poland explains that public health measures — and vaccination and boosters — are still the best way to protect yourself from COVID-19.

"What can I say but what we have said all along," implores Dr. Poland. "Hands, face, space and vaccines. It works."

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the latest COVID-19 news, including a study on the true death toll of COVID-19, an update on the BA.2 variant and the latest on vaccines for children under 5.

March 15, 2022

Skin Cancer and Skin Lesions: What to Look For

Guest: Dawn Marie R. Davis, M.D.

Host: Sanjeev (Sanj) Kakar, M.D. (@sanjkakar)

Did you know that skin cancer is the number one cancer in the United States, with an estimated 3.5 million cases a year? In fact, your lifetime incidence is 1 in 5, or 20%. In this week’s podcast, Dawn Marie R. Davis, M.D., a Pediatric and Adult Dermatologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, discusses all things skin cancer. She provides tips and tricks in the management of common forms of skin cancer that providers need to be aware of when patients present with skin lesions. Dr. Davis also discusses the role of skin-protecting creams and their applicability to persons of all skin colors.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

 

March 8, 2022

Mild Cognitive Impairment, Dementia, and Alzheimer’s Disease

Guest: Ronald C. Petersen, M.D., Ph.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Nearly six million people in the United States age 65 and older have Alzheimer’s Disease; of these about 80% are 75 years old and older. It is a devastating disease, not only for the patient, but also for the family of the patient involved. Unfortunately, currently available treatment for Alzheimer’s has been disappointing. Cure or even stability of the cognitive loss is not possible. The topics for today’s podcast include mild cognitive impairment and dementia, focusing on Alzheimer’s Disease, and our guest is Ronald C. Petersen, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurologist and specialist in Alzheimer’s Disease and other dementias. We’ll discuss the evaluation, the current available treatment as well as what might be on the horizon in the management of this disease.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 1, 2022

Heart Disease in Women

Guest: Sharonne N. Hayes, M.D. (@SharonneHayes)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

 

Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death for individuals in the United States. Many assume this is primarily a disease of men, but it also continues to be the leading cause of mortality in women, accounting for one of every three female deaths. There’s also evidence that symptoms of cardiovascular disease may be somewhat different than in males. As a result, women are often given a different evaluation and may receive different treatment than males. To help us sort this out, our guest for this podcast is Sharonne N. Hayes, M.D., a cardiologist and specialist in women’s heart disease from the Mayo Clinic. We’ll discuss the misconceptions of cardiovascular disease in women, the variety of symptoms they may develop and treatment considerations that may be different than men typically receive.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

 

February 22, 2022

Amyloidosis: Recognition, Diagnosis and Treatment

Guest: Eli Muchtar, M.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Amyloidosis is an uncommon disease, possibly even considered rare. It has a variety of presentations and some varieties tend to occur in association with other diseases. The presenting symptoms depend on the organ system involved. Unless we think of the condition, we may miss the opportunity to diagnose it early. As a result, many patients are diagnosed with amyloidosis at a rather advanced stage. The topic for this podcast is amyloidosis and our guest is Eli Muchtar, M.D., from the Division of Hematology at the Mayo Clinic. We’ll discuss the common organ systems affected by amyloidosis, how it’s diagnosed, the available treatment and the research currently taking place in amyloidosis.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

February 17, 2022

Mayo Clinic Q&A: COVID-19 News Update

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in February 2022

Guest: Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland)

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd)

As the U.S. moves beyond the omicron surge of the COVID-19 pandemic, key indicators are dropping.

"Both the acute indicators — number of cases — and the lagging indicators — hospitalizations and then deaths — are all dropping slowly, but they're surely dropping," says Dr. Gregory Poland, head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group

Experts warn that caution is still needed to protect yourself in certain situations, including masking in crowded indoor settings and making sure you are up to date with your COVID-19 vaccinations and boosters.

While the latest surge wanes, COVID-19 research continues. 

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses the latest COVID-19 news, including a new study on the long-term effects of COVID-19 on the heart and why Pfizer is delaying the request for emergency use authorization of its COVID-19 vaccine for children under 5.

February 15, 2022

Infertility in Males

Guest: Sevann Helo, M.D. (@Helo_MD)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Approximately one in seven couples is considered infertile. In a significant number of these couples, male infertility plays a role. Many of these couples will initially present to their primary care provider for help. Depending on our practice, we may not see all that many patients with this concern and, as a result, we might not be comfortable with the evaluation of the infertile couple. Today’s podcast will review infertility in males and hopefully give us a better understanding of the causes of infertility and how to evaluate the infertile male. Our guest for today’s podcast is Sevann Helo, M.D., a urologist at the Mayo Clinic. We’ll discuss what it takes for fertilization to take place, risk factors for infertility in males, the evaluation of the male for infertility, potential treatment options and effectiveness of treatment.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.