Category: Education

Timely consultations relevant for family medicine, primary care, and general internal medicine topics for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and residents. Offering CME credit for most episodes at https://ce.mayo.edu/podcast. Produced by @MayoMedEd.

September 21, 2021

Regenerative Techniques for the Larynx

Guest: David G. Lott, M.D.

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

About 60,000 Americans have had their vocal cords removed due to disease or trauma necessitating a laryngectomy. Post-laryngectomy, patients are unable to speak, are at risk for aspiration, and many suffer from significant anguish resulting in depression. Fortunately, there are several treatment options available, the first being laryngeal transplant. While laryngeal transplantation allows patients to smell, taste, swallow, and communicate, it has drawbacks. Currently only a small number of larynx transplants are done in the U.S., and only a select few patients with laryngectomy qualify for larynx transplant. In this episode, Dr. David Lott, division chair of laryngology at Mayo Clinic’s Arizona campus, discusses the role of regenerative medicine, which has shown promise in using 3D printing and a patient’s stem cells in creating a larynx.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

September 16, 2021

Genes & Your Health Edition - How Does Viral Genetics Influence Transmission, Diagnosis, and Severity of COVID-19?

To claim credit for this series, visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/online-education/content/mayo-clinic-talks-podcast-genes-your-health#group-tabs-node-course-default1

Guests: Andrew D. Badley, M.D. (@BadleyAndrew); Matthew J. Binnicker, Ph.D. (@DrMattBinnicker)

Host: Denise M. Dupras, M.D., Ph.D.

COVID-19. Variants. The future. Does one test fit all?  Will the vaccine continue to provide protection against future variants? What makes the Delta variant more transmissible? Join the second episode of our Genes & Your Health Edition from the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine to learn how viral genetics influence transmission, diagnosis, and severity of COVID-19.

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

September 14, 2021

Genes & Your Health Edition - Genomics and Healthcare, Why Does it Matter?

To claim credit for this episode, visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/online-education/content/mayo-clinic-talks-podcast-genes-your-health#group-tabs-node-course-default1

Guests: Matthew J. Ferber, Ph.D. (@Matt_Ferber); Teresa M. Kruisselbrink, M.S., CGC (@T_Kruisselbrink); William C. Palmer, M.D. (@williampalmermd)

Host: Denise M. Dupras, M.D., Ph.D.

For so long we've heard Genetic Testing is coming. Well guess what, it’s here!  We have over 25 million people who have chosen to participate in direct-to-consumer testing alone. What does this mean for primary care, and does it matter? Find out in the first episode of our Genes & Your Health Edition from the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine.

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

August 31, 2021

Evaluating Hematuria

Guest: Aaron M. Potretzke, M.D. (@potretzke)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Microscopic hematuria, and less commonly gross hematuria, are conditions commonly seen by the primary care provider. Malignancy is the most ominous cause of hematuria. Fortunately, other causes are much more likely. Since this is a relatively common health condition, when should we investigate hematuria and what should the evaluation consist of? How do we evaluate a patient’s risk for urinary tract malignancy? Dr. Aaron Potretzke, a urologist at Mayo Clinic joins us to discuss these questions.

Specific topics:

  • Definition of hematuria
  • Benign causes of hematuria
  • Risk of malignancy in low, medium, and high-risk patients
  • Stratifying malignancy risk in patients for genitourinary malignancy
  • Recommended evaluation for patients with hematuria
  • How to manage patients with persistent hematuria despite a negative evaluation
  • Role of urine cytology in the evaluation of hematuria

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

August 24, 2021

Exercise is First-Line Treatment for Your Parkinson’s Patients

Guest: Edward R. Laskowski, M.D. (@DrEdSportsMed)

Host: Sanjeev (Sanj) Kakar, M.D. (@sanjkakar)

Daily exercise has so many health and emotional benefits – it can help decrease your blood pressure, promote cardiovascular wellbeing, alleviate stress, and assist with weight loss and blood sugar control. Parkinson’s disease is a condition that affects the central nervous system, and in particular the brain, that can lead to shakiness, poor balance, and frequent falls. Joining us in this episode is Edward Laskowski, M.D., a professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation and sports medicine specialist at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester Campus, to discuss why exercise is first-line treatment for your Parkinson’s patients.

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

June 22, 2021

The Sobering Statistics of Alcohol Use Disorder

Guest: Terry D. Schneekloth, M.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

According to the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, nearly 26% of individuals 18 and older reported that they engaged in binge drinking and slightly over 6% engaged in heavy alcohol use within the past month. Binge drinkers were 70 to 90 times more likely to have an alcohol-related emergency department visit. Based on their data from this study, they estimated that nearly 15 million people ages 12 and older had alcohol use disorder. It’s also known that those with alcohol use disorder commonly seek care from primary care providers for alcohol-related medical problems. Our guest for this podcast is Terry Schneekloth, M.D., a psychiatrist and addiction specialist at Mayo Clinic.

Specific topics discussed:

  • Definition of alcohol use disorder
  • Risk factors for alcohol use disorder
  • Role of genetics
  • Questions primary care providers should ask to explore the possibility of an alcohol use disorder in patients
  • Physical exam or lab findings which could suggest an alcohol use disorder
  • Available treatment options and their alcohol use disorder effectiveness

Additional Resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

June 15, 2021

The Agony of Da Feet - Assessing Foot and Ankle Pain and Injury

Guest: Daniel B. Ryssman, M.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Generally, we take our feet for granted. It’s not unusual for a person to take 8- to 10-thousand steps per day. That translates to over 115,000 miles in a lifetime. By the time we reach 70 years old, the average person will have walked the equivalent of 4 times around the globe. Yet, we stop taking our feet for granted when they hurt, and it’s estimated that 75% of Americans will experience foot problems of varying degrees of severity during their lifetime. In this podcast, we’ll discuss foot and ankle pain with Daniel Ryssman, M.D., an orthopedist and sports medicine physician from Mayo Clinic. We’ll review some of the common injuries to the ankle such as sprains and fractures as well as common chronic conditions of the foot such as plantar fasciitis and bunions. Dr. Ryssman delves into the best ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat these conditions as well as what, if any, imaging to order.

Specific topics discussed:

  • Ankle sprains
  • Ankle fractures
  • Achilles’ tendon rupture
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Bunions
  • Metatarsalgia

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

April 27, 2021

Fact or Fiction: Erectile Dysfunction Treatments

Guest: Tobias S. Kohler, M.D., M.P.H.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Erectile dysfunction not only causes lifestyle changes, but it may also be the first symptom of peripheral vascular disease. Since many men are reluctant to mention erectile dysfunction to their healthcare provider, it’s important for us to ask our patients whether it is a problem and be knowledgeable in the appropriate evaluation of patients who have it. This reluctance may cause many to seek out readily available but ineffective treatments from questionable sources, even though there are a variety of proven, effective treatments that can be prescribed. Tobias S. Kohler, M.D., M.P.H., a Mayo Clinic Urologist, joins us to discuss the impact of erectile dysfunction, the currently available effective treatments, as well as the unproven, ineffective products currently being used.

Specific topics discussed:

  • The first historical appearance of treatments for erectile dysfunction
  • Most common causes of dysfunction
  • Appropriate evaluation of patients who present with erectile dysfunction
  • Review of the currently available effective treatment options
  • Reasons men are reluctant to mention the topic of erectile dysfunction to their provider
  • Review of some ineffective treatments currently being promoted

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 30, 2021

Your Patient Has a Thyroid Nodule – What Now?

Guest: Jan L. Kasperbauer, M.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Thyroid nodules are commonly found in patients by primary care providers, either by physical exam or incidentally by a variety of imaging studies. Fortunately, the vast majority of thyroid nodules are benign, however as primary care providers we need to be comfortable in evaluating them to rule out the possibility that they represent a thyroid cancer. Joining us is Dr. Jan Kasperbauer, an otolaryngologist at the Mayo Clinic. We discuss risk factors for thyroid cancer, how a primary care provider should evaluate and manage patients with thyroid nodules, various types of thyroid cancer, and treatment options as well as the recommended follow-up for patients with thyroid cancer.

Specific topics discussed:

  • Risk factors for thyroid cancer
  • Detecting thyroid cancers
  • How primary care provider should evaluate and manage patients with thyroid nodules
  • Review of the various types of thyroid cancer
  • Treatment options for thyroid cancer
  • Recommendations for primary care providers in following patients with treated thyroid cancer

Additional resources:

  • Classification for risk stratification and follow up recommendations: Grant, EG, et al. Thyroid ultrasound reporting lexicon: white paper of the ACR thyroid imaging, reporting and data system (TIRADS) committee. J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Dec; 12(12): 1272-1279. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacr.2015.07.011

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 23, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 68: Skin Integrity in Patients with COVID-19

Guest: Jennifer L. Elmer, APRN, CNS, D.N.P.; Brianna M. Skrukrud, APRN, C.N.P.

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

Pressure injuries in bedridden patients present significant challenges​, which are compounded in the patient with a COVID-19 diagnosis. In this episode we discuss the problems encountered in preventing, diagnosing, and managing skin alterations in patients with COVID-19. Jennifer L. Elmer, APRN, CNS, D.N.P. and Brianna M. Skrukrud, APRN, C.N.P., two wound care experts at Mayo Clinic, discuss situations ​in which, despite best efforts, pressure injuries are unavoidable and why COVID-19 poses a great risk for skin alterations in hospitalized patients. They also discuss the 2020 position statement of National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel (NPIAP) on the management of skin alterations during the COVID-19 crisis.

Additional resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 18, 2021

Can We Prevent Suicide?

* WARNING: This episode discusses suicide and suicidal ideation. *

Guest: J. Michael Bostwick, M.D.(@DrBostwick)

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

In this episode, professor of psychiatry and international authority on suicide risk and challenges in suicide prevention, J. Michael Bostwick, M.D.  from Mayo Clinic in Rochester joins us. He’ll discuss epidemiological-based research looking at the utilization patterns of medical care by individuals who have contemplated or committed suicide. Dr. Bostwick will describe the concept of suicide crisis including risk factors, current events/warning signs, and mental status/agitation. He’ll also explain self-agency, stigma of discussing mental illness, potential value-based societal approach to individuals in distress and despair, and potential solutions to the suicide prevention.

Additional resources:

If you're feeling overwhelmed by thoughts of not wanting to live or you're having urges to attempt suicide, get help now.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 17, 2021

Mayo Clinic Q&A: “Brain Fog” is a Lingering Condition for Many COVID-19 Long-Haulers

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in March, 2021. 

Guest:  Billie A. Schultz, M.D. 

Host: Halena M. Gazelka, M.D. (@hmgazelkamd

Fatigue and what's being called "brain fog" are turning out to be some of the most common issues for long-hauler patients recovering from COVID-19. The National Institutes of Health calls these and other symptoms, which can last for several months, post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2, or PASC.

Those suffering from brain fog may experience short-term memory loss, confusion, difficulty concentrating, or just feeling different than they did before they had COVID-19, even if it was a mild case of the infection. 

And Dr. Billie Schultz, a Mayo Clinic physical medicine and rehabilitation expert, says, though older patients more often to have these symptoms more often, younger people are also showing up with brain fog.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Schultz says brain fog seems to be more inflammatory than infection, but there are more questions than answers about this neurological concern. Meanwhile, efforts are underway to develop rehabilitation programs to help patients recover.

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 16, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 67: Finding a Solution for Every Long-Hauler

Guest: Ravindra Ganesh, M.B.B.S., M.D.

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D. (@AmitGhosh006)

It has been estimated that as many as 10-30% of patients who have recovered from COVID-19 have an array of symptoms, ranging from minor to disabling, that persist more than four weeks post-COVID infection. These symptoms have not only been identified in patients who had severe symptoms of COVID-19 requiring intensive care unit treatment, but also those who only experienced mild-to-moderate symptoms.

The exact cause of this state, most popularly called post-COVID long hauler syndrome, is still under investigation. The symptoms range from mild to disabling fatigue, body aches, atypical chest pain, loss of sense of taste and smell, brain fog, among others and many of these patients need additional evaluation and management to deal with their disabling symptoms.

In this podcast Dr. Ravindra Ganesh, the consultant in General Internal Medicine who leads the COVID Frontline Care Team (CFCT) efforts, as well as the Post-COVID Clinic, at Mayo Clinic Rochester, discusses the array of symptoms, management strategies, and research possibilities, as well as opening of an upcoming clinic in Mayo Clinic Rochester that would address the concern of the patient's and deal with the post COVID long hauler symptoms

Additional Resources:

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

March 9, 2021

Clostridium Difficile Infection: You Want to Transplant What?!

Guest: Maria I. Vazquez Roque, M.D. (@MVazquezRoqueMD

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD

Clostridium difficile is a toxin-producing bacterium that can result in a severe form of antibiotic-associated diarrhea known as clostridium difficile infection or CDI. Cases can vary from mild diarrhea to severe colitis that at times can be fatal. There’s been a dramatic increase in the number as well as severity of CDIs in the U.S. over the past 20 years. Although CDI typically occurs following the use of antibiotics, it can also be spread from one individual to another, especially in hospitals and skilled nursing facilities. Antibiotics have been the traditional treatment for patients with CDI, however recurrent symptoms have been a problem. There’s now a new treatment for CDI, felt to be effective in over 90% of patients with the illness. Our guest to discuss this topic is Dr. Maria Vazquez Roque, a gastroenterologist at the Mayo Clinic. We’ll review the common presenting symptoms, laboratory tests needed to establish a diagnosis, and the current recommendations for treatment including the latest of fecal transplantation. 

Additional resources: 

Clinical Practice Guidelines for Clostridium difficile Infection in Adults and Children: 2017 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA): https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix1085 

Specific topics discussed:

  • The typical presentation of C. difficile infection
  • Patients who are at increased risk for a C. difficile infection
  • Laboratory tests to order to confirm a case of C. difficile infection
  • Treatment options for C. difficile infection including fecal transplantation
  • Potential benefit of probiotics for preventing a C. difficile infection

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

February 8, 2021

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 63: Mayo Clinic Q&A - #AskTheMayoMom about Sports Participation During COVID-19

This episode is shared from Mayo Clinic Q&A and was recorded in February, 2021

To claim credit visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/covid19podcast 

Guest:  David B. Soma, M.D. (@DrDaveSoma); Talha Niaz, M.B.B.S.

Host: Angela C. Mattke, M.D. (@DrAngelaMattke)

There are many benefits to sports participation for children and adolescents. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic, activities such as youth sports have been put on hold or modified to decrease the spread of COVID-19. Also, the scientific community is learning about when it is safe to return to sports participation following COVID-19 infection.  

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, "Ask the Mayo Mom" host and Mayo Clinic pediatrician, Dr. Angela Mattke is joined by Dr. David Soma, a pediatric sports medicine physician at Mayo Clinic Children's Center, to discuss sports participation during the COVID-19 pandemic and what you need to know about return to play after COVID-19 infection. Also joining Drs. Mattke and Soma is Dr. Talha Niaz, a pediatric cardiologist at Mayo Clinic. 

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd

February 2, 2021

Want to Know About Pediatric Enuresis? Well, Urine Luck

Guest: Patricio Gargollo, M.D. (@pgargollo)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

Enuresis is relatively common in children, estimated to be present in as many as 5 to 10% of 7-year-olds. This represents up to 7 million children in the United States. As you can imagine, it carries significant social implications for the child. Our guest for this podcast is Dr. Patricio Gargollo, a pediatric urologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr. Gargollo will address the natural history of enuresis, how to evaluate the child with enuresis, how often it represents a structural urologic problem and how often a treatable cause is found. Practical advice for parents of children with enuresis is also discussed.

Specific topics:

  • Potential for children with enuresis to have bladder control problems when they develop into adulthood.
  • Social impact of enuresis on a child.
  • Potential risk factors and causes of enuresis.
  • The role of genetics and enuresis.
  • The natural history of enuresis.
  • How often a structural urologic problem is found to explain enuresis.
  • Pharmacologic treatment options.
  • The evaluation of a child with enuresis.

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

January 19, 2021

Adult Eating Disorders

Guest: Leslie A. Sim, Ph.D., L.P. (@DrLeslieSim)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

A variety of eating disorders can occur in adults and they are associated with multiple potential health complications, including an increased risk of death. Some studies report that up to 20% of those with Anorexia Nervosa will die as a result of the condition. Would you recognize an eating disorder in the patients you see? What clues should you look for? In this week’s Mayo Clinic Talks, we’ll speak with Dr. Leslie Sim, a psychologist at the Mayo Clinic. We’ll discuss who is most likely to develop an eating disorder, important “red flag” symptoms, questions you should ask patients to help confirm a diagnosis, and how we should approach a patient we suspect has an eating disorder.

Topics discussed:

  • Definition of an eating disorder
  • Important “red flag” symptoms that may indicate an eating disorder
  • Health complications that can occur as a result of an eating disorder
  • Who is most likely to have an eating disorder
  • The genetic component to eating disorders
  • Clues from their childhood that suggest patients may have an eating disorder as an adult
  • Events which can trigger an eating disorder
  • When we should suspect an eating disorder
  • How we should approach a patient we suspect has an eating disorder
  • Management of eating disorders
  • Effectiveness of treatment

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

December 29, 2020

Addressing the Burdens of Family Caregivers

Guest: Alisha Morgan, D.O. (@AAMORGAN_DO)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

It’s estimated that there may be over 30 million individuals in the U.S. who provide ongoing care to older adults, half of these to family members with some form of dementia. The majority of these caregivers are female and a significant percentage of these caregivers have their own major health problems. This has become a major social and economic issue in the care of our geriatric patients. Dr. Alisha Morgan, a family medicine and hospice physician at the Mayo Clinic joins us to address the challenges associated with being a caregiver, how healthcare providers should assess caregiver burden, potential financial resources available to assist caregivers, and interventions to reduce the impact of stress on caregivers.

Specific topics:

  • Morbidity and mortality of care givers
  • The amount of time caregivers devote to assisting older adults
  • Financial burden of providing chronic care to older adults
  • How primary care providers should acknowledge caregivers
  • How primary care providers should evaluate
  • How caregiver stress should be provided
  • Available financial resources for caregivers

Caregiver Resources: https://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/entertainment/books/2015-04/Caregivers_Excerpt.pdf

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

December 15, 2020

Sensorineural Hearing Loss

Guest: Matthew L. Carlson, M.D. (@MatthewLCarlso1)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD

Issues surrounding hearing loss are discussed with Dr. Matthew Carlson, an ENT physician from the Mayo Clinic. Specific topics discussed include the following:

  • Types of hearing loss (conductive vs. sensorineural)
  • Social impact of hearing loss
  • Symptoms patients notice with gradually progressive hearing loss
  • Tinnitus and it’s management
  • Causes of sensorineural hearing loss
  • High frequency tone loss and problems with speech discrimination associated with sensorineural hearing loss
  • Hearing loss associated with loud noise exposure (acoustic injury and chronic noise exposure)
  • Hearing loss associated with the use of firearms
  • Common everyday activities which may result in hearing loss
  • Management of sensorineural hearing loss (hearing aids, cochlear implants)
  • Recent advances and improvements in hearing aids

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

December 8, 2020

Immunizations: Let’s Get to the Point

This episode was recorded on October 23, 2020.

Guest: Robert M. Jacobson, M.D. (@RobertJMD)

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD)

It’s estimated that immunizations have saved more lives and prevented more disabilities than any other medical intervention. They’re also extremely cost effective and their benefits far outweigh the very small risks they carry. Yet there are individuals who choose to believe that immunizations are potentially harmful. Our guest for this podcast is Dr. Robert Jacobson, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician and expert in the field of immunizations. We cover topics including an update on the COVID-19 vaccine and when it will realistically be available on a large scale for the population. Other important issues discussed include which vaccines are important for children and adults and whether it’s safe to administer multiple vaccines at one time. Finally, many of the concern promoted by the anti-vaccine movement are discussed and dispelled.

Specific topics discussed:

  • Variety of vaccines in development for COVID-19
  • Novel techniques being use in the development of the COVID-19 vaccine
  • Timing on the availability of the COVID-19 vaccine
  • Important immunizations for children
  • Important immunizations for adults
  • Anti-vaccine concerns and myths surrounding vaccines
  • Updates on the age recommendations for the HPV vaccine

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

December 1, 2020

Be Safe Not Sorry: Teaching Patients Proper Handwashing Technique

Guest: Gregory A. Poland, M.D. (@drgregpoland

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D. (@ChutkaMD

Many of us learned how to wash our hands at a very early age and have relearned the importance and proper technique periodically along the way. Research suggests that many people may not be doing it correctly. Dr. Greg Poland a Professor of Medicine in Infectious Disease at the Mayo Clinic joins us for National Hand Washing Awareness Week to discuss some tips and tricks to share with your patients to ensure they’re reaching the full potential of this life-saving technique. He’ll also answer questions like does it matter if the water is hot? Is handwashing with soap more effective than anti-bacterial gel or lotions? And, when should we be washing our hands? 

Additional resources mentioned (not an endorsement or affiliation): 

Glo Germ: Visual Tool for Handwashing 

Jimmy Kimmel and Guillermo Learn How to Wash Their Hands 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd.

October 6, 2020

The Evolution of Pharmacogenomics

Guest: Richard Weinshilboum, M.D.

Host: Darryl S. Chutka, M.D.

In a similar way to how anesthesia changed the practice of surgery, pharmacogenomics will produce a similar change in how we prescribe medications. Listen in to world-renowned expert Dr. Richard Weinshilboum discuss the evolution of the field and how advances are accelerating its application at the bedside. 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd

August 25, 2020

Regenerative Medicine Takes on Hair Loss

Guest: Alison J. Bruce, M.B., Ch.B. & Shane A. Shapiro, M.D. 

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D., M.B.A. (@AmitGhosh006

Androgenic alopecia can have a significant impact on women across a spectrum of age. The psychological and social impact of hair thinning and hair loss can significantly decrease quality of life. Dr. Alison Bruce breaks down different types of hair loss, who’s a candidate, and new therapies on the horizon. Dr. Shane Shapiro will discuss the application of regenerative medicine to this condition and how platelet rich plasma has demonstrated efficacy at regrowing hair. 

Deeper Dive: 

  • A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Trial Comparing Platelet-Rich Plasma to Topical Minoxidil Foam for Treatment of Androgenic Alopecia in Women doi: 10.1097/DSS.0000000000002168 

Episode transcript: https://mcdn.podbean.com/mf/web/d545pv/Ep_185-Regenerative_Medicine_Takes_on_Hair_Loss.pdf

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd

August 11, 2020

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 46: Physician Leaders and the Science of Health Care Delivery

This episode was recorded August 6, 2020. 

To claim credit visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/covid19podcast 

Guest: Lisa A. McGee, M.D. 

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D., M.B.A. (@AmitGhosh006

What are population centered care and health? How do we best use rationed resources within our health care system to most effectively meet these needs? Dr. Lisa McGee discusses the Science of Health Care Delivery,  the impact mass media messages have had on the current COVID-19 pandemic, and how we can use the information we have about population centered health to address key influential components of SARS-CoV-2’s continual spread. 

Suggested Readings: 

  1. The effect of public health measures on the 1918 influenza pandemic in U.S. cities 
    https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0611071104 
  2. Public health interventions and epidemic intensity during the 1918 influenza pandemic 
    https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0610941104 

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19 

Connect with the Mayo Clinic’s School of Continuous Professional Development online at https://ce.mayo.edu/ or on Twitter @MayoMedEd

August 4, 2020

COVID-19 Miniseries Episode 45: There Is No Win-Win

This episode was recorded on June 26, 2020.

To claim credit visit: https://ce.mayo.edu/covid19podcast 

Guest:  Pritish K. Tosh, M.D. (@DrPritishTosh

Host: Amit K. Ghosh, M.D., M.B.A. (@AmitGhosh006

Novel viruses causing outbreaks tend to do one of three things: disappear completely, become endemic in certain areas, or roll through populations with ongoing transmission until herd immunity is achieved or an effective vaccine is developed. Dr. Pritish Tosh states, “If natural infection doesn’t cause long-lasting protective immunity or the vaccines don’t do the same, this thing could be with us for a long time.” Take a walk through the past 100 years of pandemics as Dr. Tosh draws comparisons and lessons learned. 

The Economist - The Grim Calculus 
https://www.economist.com/leaders/2020/04/02/covid-19-presents-stark-choices-between-life-death-and-the-economy 

AskMayoExpert COVID-19 Resources: https://askmayoexpert.mayoclinic.org/navigator/COVID-19 

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